The City of De Leon contracts out to

Comanche County Emergency Management.

 

 For the burn ban status, click here.

 

Grimshaw

Tricia Grimshaw

Posted on August 5, 2017

Ray

Raymond Helburg

Posted on August 5, 2017

TOBY HIGHT

Toby Hight

Posted on January 25, 2016

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1. Be Informed

The City has a high-frequency tornado siren in place, for life-threatening emergencies. It is tested every first Monday of the month at 10 am.

The City does not have any sand bags to offer, you will need to contact the local TXDOT in Comanche for sandbags. For information on the local TXDOT offices, click here.

In a major disaster, it might be several days before vital city services are restored. De Leon is exposed to a wide variety of hazards, both natural and man-made, including tornadoes, fires, severe storms, and flooding. Your best defense is to be informed and prepared for emergencies, both at home and in your place of business. We've provided a number of resources to help you create a plan that will assist you during an emergency.

2. Get Alerts

Sign up on Code Red to receive critical information quickly in a variety of situations, such as severe weather, & flooding. You’ll get time-sensitive messages wherever you specify, such as your home, mobile or business phones, email address, text messages and more.
 

3. Prepare an Emergency Plan for Your Business

How quickly your company can get back to business after a fire, flood or tornado often depends on emergency planning done today. Don't hesitate!! Please visit the Department of Homeland Security's website today to set up yours.
 

4. Disaster Recovery

Recovery activities are those necessary to restore services and systems to a state of normalcy. Recovery actions include damage assessment and those necessary to return health and safety systems (e.g., water) and services (e.g., acute health care) to minimum operating standards. Various recovery activities are likely to be long-term and may continue for many years.

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